Long-term driving in men can affect fertility

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According to new research, men who professionally drive cars are more likely to experience infertility. The researchers found that driving can increase the temperature of the scrotum, which can have a negative effect on sperm formation in the testicles.

According to new research, men who professionally drive cars are more likely to experience infertility. The researchers found that driving can increase the temperature of the scrotum, which can have a negative effect on sperm formation in the testicles.

The research team conducted the trial on nine adult men. They attached the thermometer to the surface of the subject's scrotum. Subjects walked first, then drove for 160 minutes. During the first 20 minutes of driving, the subjects' mean scrotal temperature rose from 34.2°C to 35.5°C. During the last two hours, the scrotal temperature reached as high as 36.2°C. The average temperature while driving was 2.2°C higher than when walking.

Past research has found that men who drive for a living have lower sperm counts, higher rates of abnormal sperm, and that their wives take longer to get pregnant after marriage, but the reasons for these problems are unclear. Dr. Miauxchet, who led the study in France, said that increased scrotal temperature during driving may be one of the important reasons for the reduced fertility of professional drivers.

Use the baby doppler sonoline b to view the heartbeat of the fetus in the abdomen, observe the fetus at all times, and pay attention to his growth.

People already know the importance of keeping the scrotum cool. For example, two years ago, Australia produced "air-conditioned underwear" to prevent the scrotum from getting too hot. In fact, the size and thickness of the inner and outer pants have a more important influence on the temperature of the scrotum. Drivers should pay attention.

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